The Warlock for Pathfinder

Greetings. The point of this little exercise is to take the Warlock character class from the 3.5 edition of Dungeons and Dragons and convert it to use in the Pathfinder game. Pathfinder characters tend to be more robust than their third edition counterparts, with more choices and toys at their disposal. The fourth edition of D&D lights the way by introducing different pacts for the warlock to follow. In this post I’m going to go through all of the warlock’s class abilities in turn and explain the changes I’m proposing as well as suggesting alternatives. At the end I’ll try and tie everything together and make some suggestions for discussion points.

I hope that by the end we’ll have rules for three different versions of the warlock based on the original 4e pacts: the Infernal Pact (with devils and diabolic entities), the Fey Pact (with powerful sylvan and fey creatures), and the Star Pact (with aberrations and other Lovecraftian horrors). I’ll then write up a finished version.

The Warlock first appeared in Complete Arcane published in 2004. The sorcerer withstanding, I think it’s fair to say that it’s the most successful new base class introduced in the third edition era. If you don’t have a copy of Complete Arcane to hand you can find the full class at D&D Tools here: http://dndtools.eu/classes/warlock/. The Warlock was not part of the third edition Open Gaming content, so Paizo is unable to produce their own version for the Pathfinder game. So without further ado, let’s press on:

Alignment

You can’t see the expression of contempt I’m currently wearing. I hate Alignment – go and read the latest House Rules document and remind yourselves of my take on it. Anyway – the 3.5 rules state that the warlock has to be evil or chaotic. This is because the original warlock is very much the diaboloist – treating solely with devils and demons. As it’s my intention to expand the warlock from these roots to make pacts with other entities, it seems appropriate to widen the Alignment suggestions as well. Personally, I would now place it in a similar vein to the cleric. The Alignment should be the same or within one step of the alignment of warlock’s Patron. Does that sound reasonable?

Base Attack Bonus

There’s been no change in base attack bonuses between D&D 3.5 and Pathfinder. The warlock  shares its BAB progression with the rogue and cleric. This seems perfectly acceptable for a class that is going to be making many attack rolls, but shouldn’t be as proficient as one of the warrior classes. So no change here.

Hit Dice

In 3.5 the Warlock shared hit dice with the rogue (d6). In Pathfinder, characters on the lower end of the hit die scale got a bump. Rogues in Pathfinder went from d6 to d8; wizards went from d4 to d6. Under those guidelines it only seems fair that the Warlock’s hit dice is increased to d8. To further justify this change, it’s a stated intent of the Pathfinder rules to marry up base attack bonuses and hit dice. All classes with moderate base attack progression (like the warlock) should be using a d8 for their hit points.

Saving Throws

The warlock in 3.5 has the same saving throw progression as the wizard: good Will saving throws, but poor Fortitude and Reflex saves. There’s no point changing things for the sake of being contrary, so this progression stands.

Skills and Skill Ranks

The number of base skill points/ranks per level didn’t change between 3.5 and Pathfinder. The original warlock had 2 + Int Mod skill points per level, so that’s what our Pathfinder version is going to get as well.

The list of class skills does have to change because the skill list itself changed between these editions. In 3.5 these were the warlock’s class skills: Bluff (Cha), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Disguise (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Knowledge Arcana (Int), Knowledge The Planes (Int), Knowledge Religion (Int), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Spellcraft (Int), and Use Magic Device (Cha). However, modifying this list is more than transposing the skills to their Pathfinder equivalents.

I want the Warlock to have different pacts and patrons available. Like the cleric, some skills might be inappropriate for certain pacts but essential for others. A fey-pact warlock might have Diplomacy as a class skill instead of Intimidate. I think there should be a core list of skills that all warlocks have as class skills, and then a handful of other class skills that are dependent on the warlock’s pact. Here’s my first stab at this list:

Core class skills of all warlocks: Bluff (Cha), Craft (Int), Disguise (Cha), Knowledge Arcana (Int), Knowledge Religion (Int), Fly (Dex), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Spellcraft (Int), Use Magic Device (Cha)

Fey Pact class skills: Diplomacy (Cha), Knowledge Nature (Int), Survival (Wis)

Infernal pact class skills: Appraise (Int), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge The Planes (Int)

Star pact class skills: Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge Dungeoneering (Int), Linguistics (Int)

Such a list would give the warlock 13 class skills in Pathfinder compared to 13 class skills in version 3.5. The only skill the warlock had in 3.5 that it doesn’t have now is Jump – which translates into Acrobatics in Pathfinder, and didn’t really seem appropriate to any of these warlocks.

Weapon and Armour Proficiencies

In third edition warlocks are proficient with all simple weapons and light armour, but not with shields. Proficiencies like these generally haven’t changed between 3.5 and Pathfinder versions of classes, so I see no great point in changing these. A particularly martial warlock could be recreated using an archetype I suppose, but for the most part I think all warlocks should stick to these weapon and armour proficiencies.

Eldritch Blast

Eldritch Blast is the signature ability of the warlock. It’s described in Complete Arcane as a ray of “baleful magical energy” that the warlock is able to shoot at his foes at will, but as it’s a standard action he can use it no more than once per round. The energy of an eldritch blast is magical but otherwise untyped – it’s not a force effect or an elemental effect. It inflicts hit point damage to creatures and half that damage to objects (as all energy attacks do in Pathfinder), but it needs to overcome spell resistance to do so. It has a range of 60 feet. Some or all of these base characterisitics can be modified by other class abilities, but I’ll get into a discussion about that in a moment.

I’ve no desire to alter any of the above. The only thing that I would like to alter is the damage inflict by the eldritch blast. In Complete Arcane eldritch blast inflicts 1d6 damage at 1st level, increasing by an additional d6 at 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 14th, 17th and 19th levels. At 19th level the damage maxes out at 9d6. I’d like to increase that damage in two ways:

1) I’d increase the damage progression to match a rogue’s sneak attack dice. So 1d6 at 1st level, rising by 1d6 at every odd numbered level thereafter – thus reaching 10d6 at 19th level. It’s a more structure progression, and it’s a change that doesn’t effect mid to low-level warlocks at all.

2) I would add the warlock’s Charisma modifier to the damage of his eldritch blast. So a 1st level warlock with a Charisma of 16 would inflict 1d6+3 base damage with the eldritch blast instead of just 1d6. This is a mechanic that has begun to show up in later editions of D&D, and also applies to the Warmage class from Complete Arcane. I think the warlock needs a little more poke on the damage front to hold the line in the Pathfinder game. Comparing the damage output with other characters (notably the Fighter and Wizard) is subjective, but my gut feeling is that the Warlcok needs this boost. You may disagree.

Detect Magic / Deceive Item / Imbue Item

These are pragmatic additions to the warlock’s class abilities granted to him at levels two, four and twelve. The only reason that they’re in the progression is because without them the warlock would never be able to detect magic, create magic items or use certain magic items that aren’t otherwise available to his class. The Invocations that a warlock has access to (see below!) are not spells, and therefore the item creation system from third edition doesn’t play very nicely with warlocks.

I’ve always thought that these are peculiarly specific set of abilities. Sure, I can see the utility of Detect Magic but Deceive Item doesn’t allow the Warlock to do anything that he can’t do with the Use Magic Device skill (he can just do it better), and how many players of Warlocks characters really want to spend their time making magic items? Enough to justify it being part of the core progression of the class? I don’t think so.

So partly because I need to free up some space in the class progression, and partly because I don’t think these are that important anyway, I’m removing them as class abilities. I can see that some warlocks might still want them, so I’m turning them into Invocations instead (and hopefully making them more interesting in the process). As you read on you’ll see that the warlock has a little more invocations at his disposal in the my proposed Pathfinder version of the class, so having to use an invocation slot to gain these abilities may not seem a big price to pay for a player who really wants them.

I would picture them becoming two invocations: a Least Invocation that incorporates both the Detect Magic and Deceive Item abilities; and a Greater Invocation that duplicates Imbue Item (and probably throws identify in for good measure. I haven’t written out the text of these invocations as yet.

Invocations

This is where things get interesting! Over the course of 20 levels the warlock gains a total of 12 invocations that are usable at-will. In the 3.5 version of the warlock they are divided into three categories: 1) Eldritch Essence Invocations that modify the effect of an eldritch blast – e.g. damage type; 2) Blast Shape Invocations that modify the dimensions or number of targets for the eldritch blast; and 3) Other Invocations that are spell-like abilities that mimic existing arcane and divine spells. Obviously because these abilities are usable at-will some great care as been taking in choosing which spells the warlock can use as these ‘other invocations’.

In third edition, most Warlock Invocations appeared in Complete Arcane, Complete Mage and Dragon Magic. Wizards of the Coast produced a consolidated list of all invocations in 2007 that covers pretty much everything. You can find it online here: http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/lists/invocations. Sadly D&D Tools has yet got around to indexing this material.

Invocations are an area where I want to make quite a few changes.

Firstly, I propose removing Eldritch Essence and Blast Shape Invocations from the list of a warlock’s invocations. They are effectively metamagic feats for warlocks under a different name, so I’m going to make them feats. I’ll call them “Eldritch Essence Feats” and “Blast Shape Feats” because I’m nothing if not imaginative. Warlocks will gain bonus feat slots are certain levels with which they can choose these feats. They’ll obviously be able to choose them from their list of standard feats as well. I’ll talk more about these bonus feats below.

That means the Warlock’s invocations are all of the ‘Other’ kind. They are all at-will spell-like abilities based upon existing spells, but often reflavoured or spiced-up to play into the warlock’s idiom. The warlock is still getting 12 of these invocations, but without the need to choose Eldritch Essence or Blast Shape invocations the new Pathfinder warlock is going to be more versatile than his 3.5 ancestor. I also think that the list of available Invocations is a very good place to personalise the different pacts and patrons. Although there will be some Invocations available to all warlocks, most should be unique to the different pacts.

As in the standard third edition version, these Invocations will be divided into four categories:

  • Least Invocations: gained at 1st level, based on spells of up to level two
  • Lesser Invocations: gained at 6th level, based on spells of up to level four
  • Greater Invocations: gained at 11th level, based on spells of up to level five
  • Dark Invocations: gained at 16th level, based on spells of up to level nine

I haven’t taken the time to invent any new invocations. There is some value to converting some of the more colourful 4e spells into Invocations, and I did begin work on that a while ago… although I didn’t get any further than Infernal pact spells from Player’s Handbook 1 (2008). So I don’t have a list of invocations beyond the 2007 version from the Wizards website that I linked to above.

Ideally I would need to take that list and divide the ‘other’ invocations on it into four categories: General, Infernal, Fey and Pact. Then I’d look at how equal the lists were, and draw up or convert additional spells and invocations from all editions to plug the gap. That is a long piece of work and beyond the scope of this blog post. However, if this is the direction we choose to go in, it’s probably what I’ll be concentrating on next.

Bonus Feats

My current progression has the bonus feats mentioned above conferred at levels 1, 2, 6, 10, 14 and 18. That progression is obviously up for discussion. I’ve taken the eldritch essence and blast shape invocations from Complete Arcane and converted them into feats that you can see in the following document. The text of the actual ability has not changed. A warlock can use one blast shape feat and one eldritch essence feat at the same time to modify the same eldritch blast. However, they cannot apply more than one of the same type of feat to the same blast.

There might be some mileage in limiting certain feats to certain pacts – for example, Brimstone Blast has the Infernal Warlock written all over it. There might also be worth in creating new feats that reflect the indiosyncracies of Fey and Star Pact warlocks. I have done those things as yet. Take a look at the direction I’m going in and see what you think.

Click for the New Deal Cleric (version 3)

Obviously, there are other eldritch essence and blast shape invocations out there – and material to convert from Complete MageDragon MagicCityscapeThe Drow of the Underdark and Magic of Incarnum. But like invocations, that’s a job for another time.

Pact Abilities

The 3.5 version of the class gains three other class abilities as he gains levels, all flavoured toward a diabolical patron. These are Damage Reduction (DR rising from 1/cold iron at level three to 5/cold iron at level nineteen); Fiendish Resilience (a burst of fast healing once per day); Energy Resistance (increasing resistance to two energy types). I’ve renamed these “pact abilities” because it would seem logical to change them based on the warlock’s patron: a true servant of a Hellish master is likely to have DR/silver under the Pathfinder rules, and it’s a Fey or Abyssal-pact warlock who would get DR/cold iron.

What we need to consider is whether the power level of these abilities is right for Pathfinder. Sorcerer bloodlines and cleric domains are good place to look for parity, as they grant similar abilties that rise in power as the character gains levels. These classes are much more generous when it comes to energy resistance. By 20th level energy resistance tends to max out at Immunitiy. Damage Reduction is less generous and reaching a DR 5/whatever by the end of the progression still seems appropriate. Neither clerics nor sorcerers offer fast healing, but as it’s not a continuous effect I think it’s probably fine to keep it as it is. It’s roughly comparable with the monk’s ability to heal himself.

So here are the pact abilities tweaked for the new warlock:

Infernal Pact

  • DR 1/silver rising to DR 5/silver by 20th level.
  • Choose one energy type from Fire or Cold. The warlock gains Resist 5 to this energy type at 3rd level, rising to Resist 10 at 9th level and Immunity at 20th level.
  • Choose one energy type from Fire, Cold or Acid. The warlock gains Resist 5 to this energy type at 9th level, rising to Resist 10 at 20th level.
  • The warlock adds his charisma modifier to saving throws against Poison.
  • Warlock resilience: From 8th level once per day as a free action, gain fast healing 1 for two minutes. This improves to fast healing 2 at 13th level, and fast healing 5 at 18th level.

Fey Pact

  • DR 1/cold iron rising to DR 5/cold iron by 20th level.
  • Choose one energy type from Fire or Electricity. The warlock gains Resist 5 to this energy type at 3rd level, rising to Resist 10 at 9th level and Immunity at 20th level.
  • Choose one energy type from Fire, Electricity or Cold. The warlock gains Resist 5 to this energy type at 9th level, rising to Resist 10 at 20th level.
  • The warlock adds his charisma modifier to saving throws against Charm and Compulsion effects.
  • Warlock resilience: From 8th level once per day as a free action, gain fast healing 1 for two minutes. This improves to fast healing 2 at 13th level, and fast healing 5 at 18th level.

Star Pact

  • DR 1/– rising to DR 5/– by 20th level.
  • Choose one energy type from Fire, Acid, Electricity, Sonic or Cold. The warlock gains Resist 5 to this energy type at 3rd level, rising to Resist 10 at 9th level and Immunity at 20th level.
  • Choose one energy type from Fire, Acid, Electricity, Sonic or Cold. The warlock gains Resist 5 to this energy type at 9th level, rising to Resist 10 at 20th level.
  • The warlock adds his charisma modifier to saving throws against Fear.
  • Warlock resilience: From 8th level once per day as a free action, gain fast healing 1 for two minutes. This improves to fast healing 2 at 13th level, and fast healing 5 at 18th level.

Capstone Abilities

As it currently stands a level 20 warlock gets an extra dark invocation, +1 to their DR and an increase in resistance and immunity. They don’t need much else to make 20th level special. Howver, Capstone abilities are common in Pathfinder classes, so I think there should be an extra little something. I think the easiest way to accomplish this is a change in the warlock’s Type. It’s a subtle change but one that can have profound consequences for good or ill. So a Infernal pact warlock gains the Outsider type, a Fey Pact warlock the Fey type, and a  Star Pact warlock the Aberration type. I’m calling this change “Pact Apotheosis”. I grant it may need some work.

Multiclassing

I can’t explain this any more succinctly than Complete Arcane, so I’m quoting directly from p18 and p72 of that book:

Warlocks benefit in a specific way from prestige classes that have “+1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class” or “+1 level of existing spellcasting class” as a level advancement benefit. A warlock taking levels in such a prestige class does not gain any of his class abilities, but he does gain an increased caster level when using his invocations and increased damage with his eldritch blast. Levels of prestige classes that provide +1 level of spellcasting effectively stack with the warlock’s level to determine his eldritch blast damage (treat his combined caster level as his warlock class level when looking at [… the Warlock’s class progression…] to determine eldritch blast damage) and his eldritch blast caster level (half his total caster level from his warlock levels and his levels in the prestige class that grant him an increased spellcasting level). A warlock also gains new invocations known at these prestige class levels as though he had gained a level in the warlock class.

A warlock cannot qualify for prestige classes with spellcasting level requirements, as he never actually learns to cast spells. However, prestige classes with caster level requirements, such as the acolyte of the skin, are well suited to the warlock. A warlock’s caster level for his invocations fulfils this requirement.

In the context of a feat or a prestige class requirement, a caster level prerequisite (such as “caster level 5th”) measures the character’s ability to channel a minimum amount of magical power. For feats or prestige classes requiring a minimum caster level, creatures that use spell-like abilities or invocations instead of spells use either their fixed caster level or their class level to determine qualification. For example, Craft Wondrous Item has a requirement of caster level 3rd, so both a 3rd-level warlock and a nixie (caster level 4th for its charm person spell-like ability) meet the requirement.

The Warlock’s Curse?

Fourth edition introduced an interesting mechanic into the Warlock class referred to as the warlock’s curse. Basically, once per turn the warlock was able to lay a special curse on a target he could see. Multiple targets could be cursed at any one time as long as the warlock spent a minor action (in 4e-speak) cursing them.

Cursed targets became more vulnerable to the warlock’s attacks – represented in the rules by a bonus to damage against them. As the warlock advanced in levels, so this damage increased. Should a character under the influence of a Warlock’s curse die at the warlock’s hand, then the warlock received a special benefit depending on his Pact:

Infernal Pact warlocks gained temporary hit points equal to their level; Fey Pact warlocks were able to teleport 15 feet; and Star Pact warlocks gained a cumulative +1 to a d20 roll made before the end of their next turn.

I quite liked the mechanic and I think I would have played a warlock in the old 4e campaign if Malcolm hadn’t got there first. That said, I’ve decided not to incorporate these rules into my Pathfinder version of the Warlock for a couple of reasons.

Firstly, it seemed too much. Between patrons, pacts abilities, bonus feats, invocations and eldritch blast the warlock already has a lot going on. Layering something else on top seemed to be a step too far. Secondly, the origins and inspiration for these 4e abilities don’t come from the Warlock at all – they come from the third edition Hexblade.

The Hexblade (that first appeared in Complete Warrior) was a martial warrior, with small spellcasting prowess, who gave himself the edge in combat by cursing his enemies. In 4e that concept was lifted and placed into the Warlock class. In later 4e sourcebooks, the “Hexblade Pact” was even listed as an option for warlocks.

Having looked at it more closely, I think the Warlock’s Curse rules are better used in fleshing out a new Pathfinder version of the Hexblade. I’ve changed my mind about the Hexblade serving as an archetype of the Warlock in Pathfinder. I think it can still stand on its own two feet. I’ll tackle the Hexblade in a future Conversion Catalogue feature.

Archetypes and Prestige Classes

Like the Hexblade, I think the Binder can continue to live as a class of its own. It’s too different to the warlock, and the ‘Vestige Pact’ warlock of fourth edition isn’t really close enough to the third edition version to make for a viable conversion.

I’m not looking to create any archetypes for the warlock at this stage. I think it’s something that I’d prefer to look at when necessary – if a player wants to be a warlock, but would like to tweak the class in a certain direction.

As with the sorcerer’s bloodlines and the wizard’s schools, the warlock’s pacts offer a way to customise the class without relying on archetypes. And I can see the potential of a Draconic Pact, or Abyssal Pact warlock standing alongside the core three. Indeed there’s plenty of material in the book Dragon Magic that could aid in this – and retrofitting the Dragon Shaman base class into a warlock that serves a draconic patron seems a logical step.

As for prestige classes… there are plenty of them in third edition if player’s wanted to go down that route. They would have to be converted into Pathfinder, so I think adopting an ‘as-and-when’ approach to this would be to the benefit of my sanity.

In conclusion

Following all the guidelines above, this is the warlock we end up with:

Level

Base Attack Bonus Fort Save Ref Save

Will Save

Special

Invocations Known

1

+0

+0 +0

+2

Eldritch Blast 1d6
Bonus Feat
Least Invocations

1

2

+1 +0 +0

+3

Bonus Feat
Saving Throw Bonus

2

3

+2 +1 +1

+3

Eldritch Blast 2d6
Energy Resistance

2

4

+3 +1 +1

+4

Damage Reduction 1

3

5

+3 +1 +1

+4

Eldritch Blast 3d6

3

6

+4

+2

+2

+5

Bonus Feat
Lesser Invocations

4

7

+5

+2

+2

+5

Eldritch Blast 4d6

4

8

+6/+1

+2

+2

+6

Damage Reduction 2
Warlock Resilience

5

9

+6/+1

+3

+3

+6

Eldritch Blast 5d6
Energy Resistance

5

10

+7/+2 +3 +3

+7

Bonus Feat

6

11

+8/+3 +3 +3

+7

Eldritch Blast 6d6
Great Invocations

7

12

+9/+4 +4 +4

+8

Damage Reduction 3

7

13

+9/+4 +4 +4

+8

Eldritch Blast 7d6
Warlock Resilience

8

14

+10/+5 +4 +4

+9

Bonus Feat

8

15

+11/+6/+1 +5 +5

+9

Eldritch Blast 8d6

9

16

+12/+7/+2 +5 +5

+10

Damage Reduction 4Dark Invocations

10

17

+12/+7/+2 +5 +5

+10

Eldritch Blast 9d6

10

18

+13/+8/+3 +6 +6

+11

Bonus Feat
Warlock Resilience

11

19

+14/+9/+4 +6 +6

+11

Eldritch Blast 10d6

11

20

+15/+10/+5 +6 +6

+12

Damage Reduction 5
Energy Resistance/Immunity
Pact Apotheosis

12

Granted, we have a more work to do on the list of Invocations, but I think that the principle here is sound. So what does everyone else thing? Does this version of the warlock get the thumbs up? Are there any problems that you can see?

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Housekeeping

It’s (shockingly) been more than a year since I last posted something to the blog. I can’t attest to doing anything more constructive over the last twelve months than improving my Xbox gamerscore, but there are a few announcements that I wanted to share with you all.

D&D Fifth Edition Launches Tomorrow!

Kinda. As of 3rd July (probably quite late in the day UK time) the first iteration of the new Basic Dungeons & Dragons game will be available to freely download from the Wizards of the Coast website. For those of you who haven’t been following every scrap of information on this topic: Basic D&D is *not* a simplified version of the 5th edition game – it’s the full game, albeit with less options that you’ll eventually find in the new Player’s Handbook.

Tomorrow you’ll find rules for character creation and advancement for the simplest build of the four core classes, as well as rules on how to play, equipment and spells. As more products are released over the coming months so this free version of the game will expand with more content. Expect monsters to appear after the launch of the Monster Manual, for example.

Following the release of Basic D&D the new D&D Starter Set launches in mid-July, followed by the new Player’s Handbook in August, the Monster Manual in late September and the Dungeon Master’s Guide in November. There’s a few adventures in the mix as well. This is a staggered release similar to third edition in 2000, so will be easier on my wallet.

A new 5th Edition mini-campaign, anyone?

I’m very enamoured with the new D&D rules. I think they’re the best version of D&D to date, and I’d like to take them for a test drive. Therefore I’m going to be a running the mini-campaign presented in the D&D Starter Set. It’s set in the Forgotten Realms and designed to take PCs from 1st to 5th level – about eight sessions worth of adventuring (or twenty-eight at the rate we normally play). I don’t have a specific start date in mind, neither have I decided whether I want to run it on a weekly or ad hoc basis. I don’t want it to drag out too long, though. Basically I’ll be guided by player availability.

Which brings me on the subject of players. I need some. Ideally five, which seems a tall order in these uncertain times. I have had some interest, but any of you who a) live within striking distance, b) feel like some new D&D, and c) I’ve actually met, please drop me an email.

Iourn.com has gone AWOL

For those of you keeping track of such things, access to www.iourn.com has been impossible for month or so. I’m not entirely sure why, but as the site hasn’t been updated since January 2009 I’m not in a big hurry to solve the mystery.

Please don’t worry that we’ve lost any content. I have the entire site backed up in various places. If any of you want a full copy of the site for your reference then send me an email and I’ll endeavour to get one over to you.

My longer term plan is to recreate the old site (including all its content) in WordPress. It would make it easier for me to maintain and update it, although I’d need to think long and hard about the format, navigation, theme etc. WordPress also has the advantage of being equally legible on a variety of different devices, which can only be a good thing in this post-PC world.

D&D Third Edition (Pathfinder) Campaigns

My weekly Iourn campaign, Prophet and Loss, is currently on hiatus due to player availability. I’m in no hurry to start running it again, and am happy to wait until everyone has the time and energy to continue the campaign. I still have all my notes and we can pick up where we left off fairly easily.

The ongoing adventures of the Chosen of Narramac that began back in 2000 will continue with a third campaign, To End All Wars, starting in August. This time our high level heroes are sharing the limelight with a new collection of first level PCs.

The Conversion Catalogue

I did threaten to use this blog as a venue for thrashing out rules for the conversion of old 3.5 material into Pathfinder. I’m shortly going to make good on that threat with an exploration of the third edition Warlock. I have need for warlocks in my ongoing game, and would like to throw out some ideas.

The 3.5 warlock is a bit too focused to stand against other Pathfinder classes. By taking a leaf out of fourth edition I think we can introduce different class abilities based on pacts (Fey and Star as well as the default Infernal); the Warlock’s Curse from 4e is also something worth exploring, I think. I’m also of a mind to make Hexblades and (possibly) Binders archetypes of the Warlock.

Watch this space for more information.